Read Some Desperate Gloryby Edwin Campion Vaughan – wildweaves.co.uk

Some Desperate Glory Excerpt from Publishers Weekly This stark WWI diary by a 19 year old subaltern in the British army begins with an account of his eager departure for the western front, and ends eight months later with an awesome description of the battle of Ypres in which most of his company died A snobbish, inept and generally insufferable youngster when he joined the frontline regiment, Vaughan was eventually humbled both by the tongue lashings of superiors and by his ego shattering experiences in the trenches He is frank about his fear of death, which renders the material in the latter half of the diary all the moving, for one discerns that Vaughan is gradually turning into a brave and capable leader of infantry Some entries are punctuated by mad laughter while, at the same time, a tone of despair becomes evident Best Read [ Some Desperate Glory ] By [ Edwin Campion Vaughan ] For Kindle ePUB or eBook – wildweaves.co.uk

Read Some Desperate Gloryby Edwin Campion Vaughan – wildweaves.co.uk

    10 thoughts on “Read Some Desperate Gloryby Edwin Campion Vaughan – wildweaves.co.uk

  1. So this was the end of D Company Feeling sick and lonely I returned to my tent to write out my casualty report But instead I sat on the floor and drank whiskey after whiskey as I gazed into a black and empty future.The above being the concluding sentences of this diary Eerily reminiscent of sentiments expressed by the fictional Paul Baumer in Erich Maria Remarque s masterpiece written about ten years after Vaughan s diary All Quiet on the Western Front.Edward Campion Vaughn from The Indepe So this ...

  2. I have to admit to being slightly biased as the author is my great uncle I remember my mother talking about him and other family members who were involved in both WW1 and WW2, so it was a lovely surprise to find this book it was a very large Catholic family, so we no longer had contact with that part of the family We discovered the book when it was reviewed in a national newspaper.When the author starts his diary he is very much a boy by today s standards , when the diary ends he is a man I have to admit to being slightly biased as the author is my great uncle I remember my mother talking about him and other family members who were inv...

  3. Only published in the 80s, these diaries record in a matter of fact manner the lfe of a young officer on the Western Front The episode describing the capture of a pillbox in the later stages of 3rd Ypres is, in my view, one of the most vivid accounts of WW1 action ever writ...

  4. Pretty good book Really gives you an idea of the conditions that the British fighting the Germans in France w trench warfare I do not envy Vaughn..

  5. A truly harrowing first hand account of trenches action in the First World War I recommend it to anyone who might have a romantic and heroic idea of what warfare is all about.

  6. Edwin Campion Vaughn was a junior officer in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment during the Great War This book is his diary from January to August 1917, taking him from joining his regiment in France through to the slaughter and horror of Passchendale This is very much a warts and all account told purely from Edwin Vaughan s point of view We aren t told how he fits into the British stratergy, his view is focused purely on it s impact on him Nor are we told much about the experience...

  7. Compelling reading But I felt an adversarial response to the writer that made me work harder at reading the book he wasn t likeable, he pranked others, and he was sometimes sarcastic and secretive.I do not believe that this is a diary There are clues in the text matters of wording and construction that this is a memoir that was written some time after the fact And it certainly seems like something that was written for psychological catharsis, rather than a day by day accounting of daily li Compelling reading But I felt an adversarial response to the writer that made me work harder at reading the book he wasn t likeable, he pranked others, and he was sometimes sarcastic and secret...

  8. One of the best diaries of World War I ever published Vaughn was not a writer, but his diary reads as though he spent years studying the art Some of the scenes are so heartbreaking that you can t believe any human could...

  9. This is one of the great books to come out of World War I It is a diary, from the author s arrival in France in January 1917 through fighting at Passchendaele in August of that year Vaughn would later become a decorated company commander and survived the war, but was fated to die at 33 of an overdose when his doctor gave him cocaine instead of novocaine The manuscript remained in his family s possession for decades until it was submitted to a publisher in the 1980s.Had Vaughn worked on the ma This is one of the great books to come out of World War I It is a diary, from the author s arrival in France in January 1917 through fighting at Passchendaele in August of that year Vaughn would later become a decorated company commander and survived the war, but was fated to die at 33 of an overdose when his doctor gave him cocaine instead of novocaine The manuscript remained in his family s possession for decades until it was submitted to a publisher in the 1980s.Had Vaughn worked on the manuscript after the war to bring it into publishable form, it almost certainly would have been worse for the effort, with its embarrassing and unedifying incidents homogenized or removed Instead, it has the sense of immediacy that comes from events written about as soon as they happen Vau...

  10. Vaughan s diary rivals All Quiet on the Western Front as a battlefront narrative and an insight into the thought life of a soldier in the trenches The author s detailed descriptions of his experiences at Ypres allow the reader to observe history from a truly firsthand perspective.